Alabama

Yes

Employers should screen their employees with questions related to COVID-19 symptoms and potential exposures before they report to and enter the workplace. Employers should also take the temperature of each worker with a no-touch thermometer each day when they arrive at work, or ask their employees to take their own temperatures prior to work, to confirm their temperatures are not higher than 100.4°F. Here are other recommendations that all businesses are strongly encouraged to follow: Allow employees to work from home as much as possibleScreen all employees reporting to workforce COVID-19 symptoms with the following questions: - Have you been in close contact with a confirmed case of COVID-19?- Are you experiencing a cough, shortness of breath or sore throat?- Have you had a fever in the last 48 hours?- Have you experienced new loss of taste or smell?- Have you experienced vomiting or diarrhea in the last 24 hours?Screen employees for fever: Best practice: employers should take temperatures onsite with a no-touch thermometer each day upon a person’s arrival at work. Minimum practice: an employee may take his or her temperature before arriving. In either case, a normal temperature does not exceed 100.4 degrees FahrenheitDirect any employee who exhibits COVID-19symptoms, who answers yes to any of the screening questions or who is running a fever, to leave the premises immediately and seek medical care or COVID-19 testing or both.Implement workplace cleaning and disinfection practices, according to CDC guidelines, with regular sanitization of often-touched surfaces at least every two hours.Post extensive signage on health policies, including the following documents, in the workplace:- CDC guidance to stop the spread of germs, at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/downloads/stop-the-spread-of-germs.pdf- CDC guidance on Symptoms of COVID-19, at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/downloads/COVID19-symptoms.pdf

Alaska

Yes

Employers re-opening businesses should conduct pre-shift symptom screening of their workers.Business ResponsibilitiesAll businesses should assist individuals with personal mitigation strategies including: 1. Opportunities for frequent hand washing 2. Maintaining opportunities for 6 foot distancing between all non-family members.a. This may include distanced tables, one way entrances, limited capacity services, and increased outdoor services. 3. Encourage face covering 4. Screening for people who are ill and limiting entrance to those who are healthy. 5. Regular cleaning and extra attention to high touch surfaces. 6. Special accommodations for those at higher risk to help minimize their risk.

Arizona

Yes

Employers must implement symptom screening for employees prior to the start of their shift, including temperature and wellness/symptom checks, as they arrive on premises or before opening. The state also provides guidance for specific industries. You can find that guidance in the link above. In total the following general protocols have been provided by the State of Arizona.Keeping the Workplace Safe- Educate employees about how they can reduce the spread of COVID-19- Conduct temperature or wellness checks at the start of shifts to ensure employees do not exhibit COVID-19 symptoms (fever of greater than 100.4 F, cough, shortness of breath)- Stagger work shifts so employees are not entering and leaving at the same time- Create physical distancing measures for work areas such as separating seating arrangements by six feet- Establish remote policies to have an inclusive culture for remote employees- Limit large gatherings such as meetings and opt for virtual meetings- Consider barriers such as plexiglass between employees and customers- Use contactless payment options

Arkansas

Yes

Separate requirements issued for restaurants and gym/fitness centers require employers to screen staff for specified symptoms before they enter the workplace. The State has implemented phased recommendations across industries to screen their workers for fever, cough, shortness of breath, sore throat, or loss of taste or smell as they are entering the building at the beginning of the workday. Please access the link above for more details.

California

Yes

Requires all employers to train employees on how to limit the spread of COVID-19, including how to screen themselves for symptoms and stay home if they have them. Many local counties such as San Francisco and Los Angeles have implemented pre-work employee health screening and symptom checks. At minimum the State outlines the following protocols before reopening. All facilities must:- Perform a detailed risk assessment and create a site-specific protection plan - Train employees on how to limit the spread of COVID-19. This includes how to screen themselves for symptoms and when to stay home- Set up individual control measures and screenings- Put disinfection protocols in place- Establish physical distancing guidelines

Colorado

Yes

The State requires employers to conduct daily temperature checks of their workers if feasible, or if not, to require employees to check their own temperatures at home. The State also requires all employers to implement daily health screening of workers if feasible, or if not, to require their employees to self-assess at home prior to reporting to work, with additional requirements for businesses with 50 or more employees.Best Practices for All Business:- Deputize workplace coordinator(s) charged with addressing COVID-19 issues- Maintain 6-foot distancing when possible, and discourage shared spaces- Frequently sanitize all high-touch areas - Post signage for employees and customers on good hygieneEnsure proper ventilation-Avoid gatherings (meetings, waiting rooms, etc) of more than 10 peopleImplement symptom monitoring protocols (including workplace temperature monitoring and symptom screening questions) where possible - Best practice is to implement a temperature check station at the entrance to the business. If this is not feasible, employee will check for symptoms at home and report symptoms either electronically or on paper per the system created by the business.- Eliminate or regularly sanitize any items in common spaces (i.e., break rooms) that are shared between individuals (i.e., condiments, coffee makers, vending machines) - Provide appropriate protective gear like gloves, masks, and face coverings and encourage appropriate use.

Connecticut

Yes

Recommends that employees take their own temperature at home and not report to work if their temperature exceeds 100.4°F. Separate orders for personal care services, retail restaurants and office-based businesses require employers screen employees resuming to on-premises work to confirm they have not experienced COVID-19 CDC-defined symptoms, as further described in the orders.The State provides general policies for Essential Employers including rules for symptom checking site visitors and guests. The State also has a policy that all businesses must self-certify ahead of re-opening. You can find the policies in the link above.

Delaware

Yes

Delaware requires high-risk businesses (as defined within the order) to either institute a self-reporting policy for their employees for any body temperatures at or above 99.5°F, or do temperature screening on site. High-risk businesses must also screen each incoming employee with a questionnaire containing health questions indicated within the order.- Businesses are responsible to follow the Responsibilities for all Businesses, set forth in the State of Emergency Order- Employers must enforce strict social distancing protocols.- Employees and customers have a responsibility to self-quarantine if they have a reason to expect that they may be ill with or may have come into contact with COVID-19. Employees who are symptomatic must not physically return to work until cleared by a medical professional.- Employers are encouraged to continue teleworking. Employees who have been working from home throughout this crisis should continue working from home unless there is a substantive change to business operations in Phase 2 (e.g. a business was closed, but now it’s open).- All surfaces touched by customers, including doors, restrooms, and POS infrastructure must be disinfected using an EPA-approved disinfectant every 15 minutes to 2 hours.- Hand sanitizer must be used by employees at frequent intervals during any service, appointment or scheduled event, including at a minimum after contact with surfaces touched by others, after incidental contact with a patron or visitor, and before preparing or distributing food or drink. - Employees must social distance from each other while working. This can be accomplished through spacing or moving workstations, staggering shifts or other means.- Businesses must make hand sanitizer or handwashing stations readily available for all employees, patrons, and visitors throughout the business’ location, including at each entry and exit at a minimum. -Hand sanitizer must be composed of at least 60% ethanol or 70% isopropanol.Employers must post signs on stopping the spread of COVID-19, hand hygiene and wearing cloth face covering.

Florida

None

There are no statewide orders or recommendations, but many localities have issued provisions regarding temperature and health screenings.

Georgia

None*

Governor of Georgia issues an order that requires employers in restaurants, bars, retail food establishments, gyms, fitness centers, bowling alleys, personal care services, and all other non-critical businesses conducting in-person operations screen and evaluate employees who exhibit signs of illness, such as a fever over 100.4°F, cough, or shortness of breath. Employers must require employees who exhibit signs of illness to seek medical attention and not report to work. The same order also requires gyms and fitness center to screen patrons at the facility entrance and turn away any displaying COVID-19 symptoms.Individual localities such as Cobb County and the City of Atlanta rules for re-opening may vary.

Hawaii

None

None Available

Idaho

Yes

The State has established a protocol to maintain a six (6) foot physical distancing requirement for employees and patrons. In addition, Idaho has provided protocols for how a business will provide adequate sanitation and personal hygiene for employees, vendors and patrons. Along with identifying how the business will provide services limiting close interactions with patrons such as, but not limited to: - Online, digital or telephonic ordering, - Curbside pickup delivery- Establishing hours of operations for vulnerable populations- Limiting numbers of patrons in the business at a time- Directing the flow of traffic in the business- Use of signage and barrier protection to limit movement and maintain distancingIdentify strategies for addressing ill employees, which should include requiring COVID-19 positive employees to stay at home while contagious and may include restricting employees who were directly exposed to the COVID-19 positive employee, as well as the closure of the facility until it can be properly disinfected.Businesses may on a case-by-case basis, include other practices such as screening of employees for illness and exposures upon work entry, requiring non-cash transactions, etc.

Illinois

Yes

Minimum Guidelines: 1. Employers should make temperature checks available for employees and encourage their use. Employers should post information about the symptoms of COVID-19 in order to allow employees to self-assess whether they have any symptoms and should consider going home 2. All employers should have a wellness screening program. Resources outlining screening program best practices are posted on the DCEO Restore Illinois website a. Employer should conduct in-person and mid-shift screening of employees upon entry into workplace to verify no presence of COVID-19 symptoms 3. If employee does contract COVID-19, they should remain isolated at home for a minimum of 10 days after symptom onset and can be released after feverless and feeling well (without fever-reducing medication) for at least 72 hours OR has 2 negative COVID-19 tests in a row, with testing done at least 24 hours apart 4. If an employee is identified as being COVID-19 positive by testing, CDC cleaning and disinfecting should be performed as soon after the confirmation of a positive test as practical 5. Where appropriate, notify employees who have been exposed 6. Any employee who has had close contact with co-worker or any other person who is diagnosed with COVID-19 should quarantine for 14 days after the last/most recent contact with the infectious individual and should seek a COVID-19 test at a state or local government testing center, healthcare center or other testing locations. All other employees should be on alert for symptoms of fever, cough, or shortness of breath and taking temperature if symptoms develop

Indiana

Yes

All Indiana businesses should take measures and institute safeguards to ensure a safe environment for their employees, customers, and clients. These include employee screening procedures. Back On Track Indiana recommends: - Conducting daily health assessments by utilizing a screening procedure for COVID-19 symptoms for employees who are reporting for work. Examples include self-assessments before arrival in the workplace, screening questions, or taking temperatures with a no-touch thermometer. - Have a plan in place if an employee presents symptoms. Resources for testing are available in Indiana through medical providers and the OptumServe testing procedure.‍

Iowa

Yes

The State of Iowa protocols require businesses to post signage at the door indicating no one should enter the establishment (including employees) if they currently have symptoms or have been around anyone with a confirmed COVID-19 diagnosis in the last 14 days. Businesses should continue to follow the CDC’s guidance for businesses and ensure return to work policies for employees with positive diagnoses are consistent with CDC guidance regarding self isolation. The CDC guidelines recommends that business considering conducting pre-work screening for their employees.

Kansas

Yes

Kansas department of Health and environment recommends that you pre-screen employees for symptoms. Protocols ask that businesses monitor temperatures and symptoms regularly, issue or approve personal face coverings, maintain social distancing and clean and disinfect regularly.

Kentucky

Yes

The State requires that employees undergo health survey screening and daily temperature checks. Businesses may choose whether to require on-site temperature screenings, or self-screenings conducted by employees at home at least once every 24 hours, ideally just before going to work, and reported to the employer prior to beginning work. Employees with a fever above 100.4°F should not report to work.Minimum Requirements:- Enforce Social Distancing (six (6) feet or more)- Universal face coverings- Provide Adequate Hand Sanitizer and Encourage Hand Washing- Ensure Proper Sanitation- Conduct Daily Temperature/Health checks‍

Louisiana

Yes

Louisiana Department of Health recommends that employees who have symptoms of acute respiratory illness are recommended to stay home and not come to work until they are free of fever (100.4° F [37.8° C] or greater using an oral thermometer), signs of a fever and any other symptoms for at least 24 hours, without the use of fever-reducing or other symptom-altering medicines (e.g. cough suppressants). Employees should notify their supervisor and stay home if they are sick. Ensure that your sick leave policies are flexible and consistent. The most recent guidelines appear to be from February 2020

Maine

None

Under Keep Maine Healthy the State will use local citizens to poll visitors on their health. High-density private sector businesses, such as museums and retail stores, will be encouraged to use symptom checks as well.

Maryland

Yes

Prepare your reopening and operating plan according to CDC guidance and OSHA guidance. • Prepare your physical facility - for buildings that have not been occupied, check HVAC systems and flush the water system. • Communicate your COVID-19 policies clearly to everyone, including signage for staff and visitors. • Arrange visitor and employee spacing and traffic to maintain 6 foot separation wherever possible, and prevent crowding. • Screen employees for COVID-19 symptoms at start of work.

Massachusetts

Yes

All businesses in the state of MA must develop a written control plan outlining how its workplace will comply with the mandatory safety standards for operation in the COVID-19 reopening period. Control plans do not need to be submitted for approval but must be kept on premise and made available in the case of an inspection or outbreak. All individually listed businesses must complete a control plan, even if the business is part of a larger corporation or entity. This template includes plans for social distancing, hygiene, employee staffing, ensuring employees who are displaying COVID-19-like symptoms do not report to work, clearing and disinfecting.

Michigan

Yes

The State provides what they describe as best practices workplaces should follow, with different levels of importance depending on the industry. The proper implementation of these best practices may mitigate risk in the workplace. These best practices fall into five categories:‍A. Access control: Implementing best practices to quickly identify and catalogue potential introductions of COVID-19 into the workplace ‍• Daily symptom diaries (mandatory questionnaires self-attesting to symptoms and contacts)• On-site temperature checks • Rapid diagnostic testing protocols • Intake procedures for visitors • Guidelines for delivery areas B. Social distancing: Minimizing levels of close contact within the workplace to limit the spread of COVID-19 among workers.C. Sanitation / Hygiene: Increasing both the frequency and vigor of common cleaning practices as well as implementing new ones to reduce the amount of time COVID-19 can live on surfaces. D. PPE: Ensuring all employees have access to personal protective equipment to keep them from both contracting and transmitting the COVID-19 virus • Masks to be worn whenever workers cannot consistently maintain six-feet of separation • Gloves as necessary • Face shields as necessary E. Contact tracing / Isolation: Designing and imparting to employees important procedures and protocols on what occurs if an employee is suspected to have and/ or diagnosed with COVID-19

Minnesota

Yes

Non-Critical Sector businesses and employers must develop and implement a COVID-19 Preparedness Plan prior to reopening. Businesses must ensure the Plan is evaluated, monitored, executed, and updated under the supervision of a designated Plan Administrator. Employers must ensure the Plan is posted at all of the business's workplaces in readily accessible locations that will allow for the Plan to be readily reviewed by all workers, as required.Establish health screening protocols for workers at the start of each shift (e.g. health screening survey, taking temperature). A health screening must be conducted for each business’s workers upon arrival and check-in at work. See the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH)’s Visitor and Employee Health Screening Checklist (www.health.state.mn.us/diseases/coronavirus/facilityhlthscreen.pdf). Workers must be stopped from entering the business if their responses to the health screening indicates they are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 or have tested positive for COVID-19 and they should be sent home immediately.

Mississippi

Yes

Workplaces should be mindful of providing strong hygiene support and facilitating social distancing for the safety of their employees and patrons. Employees who are sick should stay at home, and employees should be checked daily for COVID-19 symptoms

Missouri

Yes

The Show Me Strong Recovery Plan by the State of Missouri recommends that citizens maintain six feet of social distancing space in most cases. There are certain situations that require additional procedures to protect businesses, communities, and citizens.It is recommended to implement basic infection prevention measures informed by industry best practices, regarding:- Protective equipment;- Temperature checks;- Testing, isolating, and contact tracing; and- Sanitation, including disinfection of common and high-traffic areas (entrances, breakrooms, locations where there is high-frequency employee interaction with the public/customers).‍It is recommended businesses continue to:- Modify physical workspaces to maximize and maintain social distancing.- Develop an infectious disease preparedness and response plan, including policies and procedures for workforce contact tracing when an employee tests positive for COVID-19.- Monitor workforce for indicative symptoms. - Symptomatic people should not physically return to work until cleared by a medical provider.Develop, implement, and communicate about workplace flexibilities and protections, including:- Encouraging telework whenever possible and feasible with business operations;- Returning to work in phases and/or split shifts, if possible;- Limiting access to common areas where personnel are likely to congregate and interact; and- Ensuring that sick leave policies are flexible and consistent with public health guidance.

Montana

Yes

Develop and implement appropriate policies, in accordance with Federal, State, and local regulations and guidance, and informed by industry best practices, regarding: • Social distancing and protective equipment. • Temperature checks and/or symptom screening. • Collaborate with public health on testing, isolating, and contact tracing. • Sanitation. • Use and disinfection of common and high-traffic areas. Monitor workforce for indicative symptoms. Do not allow people with symptoms of COVID-19 to work.

Nebraska

Yes

Nebraska recommends that restaurants reopening for dine-in service conduct complete employee pre-screening (e.g., take temperature and assess for any symptoms consistent with COVID-19) prior to their starting work. The State has put in place another set of guidelines for meat processing facilities recommending that they conduct health screenings, including temperature checks.

Nevada

Yes

For the State of Nevada the following employers must perform a daily symptom assessment, including monitoring for fever, cough, and trouble breathing: agriculture, appliance and furniture showrooms, auto dealerships, banks and financial services, personal care services, restaurants and food and drink establishments, general office operations, retail and consumer services, and transportation, couriers, and warehousing.In addition to those sectors that require daily screening, the State recommends that employers perform self-=assessments for COVID-19 symptoms each day.‍

New Hampshire

Yes

Essential businesses and organizations and those that are reopening all or a portion of their operations must develop a process for screening all employees reporting for work for COVID-19 related symptoms by asking the questions listed in the order. The person responsible for screening should wear a cloth face covering.

New Jersey

Yes

The State of New Jersey requires that for agriculture employers. Employer is to screen workers for symptoms, including temperature and symptom checks prior to work shifts. For restaurants and other food and beverage establishments. Employers must conduct daily health checks (e.g., temperature screening and/or symptom checking) of employees safely and respectfully, and in accordance with any applicable privacy laws and regulations.

New Mexico

Yes

All employers must screen employees for symptoms before they enter the workplace each day, verbally or with a written or text/app-based questionnaire.

New York

Yes

Reopening employers must implement mandatory health screening assessment (e.g. questionnaire, temperature check) before employees begin work each day and for essential visitors. Employee assessment responses must be reviewed every day and such review must be documented.

North Carolina

Yes

Through Executive Order, businesses in North Carolina open to the public must conduct daily symptom screening of workers, using a standard interview questionnaire of symptoms, before workers enter the workplace.Some local governments in the State may have provision with regard to employee health screening. Please check with your local government for updates or policies that may directly impact your business.

North Dakota

Yes

North Dakota recommends that employers screen their employee’s temperatures when they arrive at work, and ask any employees who call in sick whether they’re experiencing COVID-19 symptoms.

Ohio

Yes

The State of Ohio requires that employees must conduct daily health self-assessments and must not report to work if symptomatic.

Oklahoma

None

There is no statewide requirement for employee health screenings as of this update. However some localities have provisions for employee screenings. Please refer to the Oklahoma State Department of Health for updated information.

Oregon

Yes

Oregon recommends that employers consider regular health checks (e.g., temperature and respiratory symptom screening) or self-reporting of symptoms by employees. A separate recommendation for personal care services advises contacting clients prior to appointments to screen for symptoms, and conducting temperature checks for clients.

Pennsylvania

Yes

All businesses conducting in-person operations must screen workers for symptoms before they enter the business.

Rhode Island

Yes

Rhode Island requires that businesses must screen all individuals entering the establishment for any reason. Screening must include, at minimum: visual assessment, self-screening, written questionnaire or a combination of any of these screening methods. Businesses must be sure to screen at all entrances, and deny entry to anyone who is confirmed to be COVID-19 positive, has COVID-19 symptoms or has had close contact with a COVID-19-positive individual.

South Carolina

Yes

South Carolina limits its screening policy to restaurant employees. You can find that policy in the following:link to hospitality policy

South Dakota

Yes

South Dakota recommends that employers ask their workers health screening questions when they report to work each day, and maintain a daily screening log.‍

Tennessee

Yes

Businesses should follow guidance issued by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, the CDC, and Tennessee Department of Health. These guidelines do not replace or supersede any applicable federal or other regulatory requirements or standards. To assist your business in taking appropriate precautions for COVID-19, industry-specific safeguarding protocols have been created with the input of private sector working groups in partnership with the Economic Recovery Group. Protocols are subject to revision and may be released on a rolling basis. Employers RequirementsAllow employees to work from home as much as possible‍Screen all employees reporting to work for COVID-19 symptoms with the following questions:‍Have you been in close contact with a confirmed case of COVID-19 in the past 14 days? (Note: This does not apply to medical personnel, first responders, or other individuals who encounter COVID-19 as part of their professional or caregiving duties while wearing appropriate PPE.)Are you experiencing a cough, shortness of breath or sore throat?Have you had a fever in the last 48 hours?Have you had new loss of taste or smell?Have you had vomiting or diarrhea in the last 24 hours?‍Temperature screening employees:‍Best practice: employers to take temperatures onsite with a no-touch thermometer each day upon arrival at workMinimum: temperatures can be taken before arriving. Normal temperature should not exceed 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit

Texas

Yes

The State of Texas provides a minimum standard health protocol for businesses that are reopening. All employees should be screened before coming into the business for specified symptoms consistent with COVID-19 or known close contact with a person who is lab-confirmed to have COVID-19. Any employee who meets any of these criteria should be sent home. Some Texas localities have provisions concerning employee health screenings that may differ from State requirements or recommendations

Utah

Yes

The State of Utah recommends an active employee Health Screening solution for all business interactions. For gyms and fitness centers and personal care services the state does require symptom checking of all staff at the beginning of each shift, with a log that can be made available for inspection by health department.Employee Monitoring Symptoms should include:Symptom checking in business interactionsTraining of managers and leadership to recognize signs of COVID-19 and to be clear on relevant protocolsSick employees or close contacts of positive COVID-19 individuals should stay homeEmployees who become sick or who develop COVID-19 symptoms while at work should be separated from other employees/customers immediately and sent home; immediately clean and disinfect areas the sick employee visited. Encourage employees to report any illness to a manager, especially if sick with fever, cough, trouble breathing, sore throat, muscle aches and pains, sudden changes in smell or tasteIf an employee is confirmed COVID-19 positive, employers should inform close contact employees while maintaining condentiality; close contact employees should follow local health department guidance

Vermont

Yes

The of Vermont requires that prior to the commencement of each work shift, all employees shall complete a health survey either in-person at the worksite or prior to arriving at the worksite. This screening survey shall require an employee to verify that he or she has no symptoms of COVID-19 (fever, cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, chills, repeated shaking with chills, fatigue, muscle or body aches, headache, congestion or runny nose, sore throat, new loss of taste or smell, nausea or vomiting, diarrhea) before they enter the workplace. It is strongly recommended that a temperature check be conducted by the employee at home or a non-contact temperature check be conducted by the employer or the employee at the worksite. Employers may create systems that work best for their unique operations – but must be able to demonstrate, if asked by employees or state health officials, how the system ensures employees have been pre-screened for symptoms before they enter the workplace.

Virginia

Yes

The State of Virginia says that screening, monitoring and testing are essential components of limiting the spread of COVID-19 in Virginia. The Health Department says that an important part of keeping workers safe is by actively encouraging sick employees to stay home if they are ill and emphasizing to all employees the importance of knowing the symptoms of COVID-19. Employers should also emphasize to employees the importance of notifying their supervisor(s) if they become ill at work and following the CDC guidelines for what to do if they are sick with symptoms of COVID-19.Virginia recommends prior to a shift and on days employees are scheduled to work, employers should screen employees for COVID-19 symptoms. The State also asks that employees also self-monitor their symptoms by self-taking of temperature to check for fever and using the questions provided in this guidance (below) before reporting to work.For employers with established occupational health programs, employers can consider measuring temperature and assessing symptoms of employees prior to starting work or before each shift.

Washington

Yes

The Washington State Department of Health recommends that employers use the information they provide as found in the link above for guidance to screen staff and visitors (excluding customers in retail) at the beginning of each shift or visit to prevent the spread of COVID-19.‍The State of Washington requires that employers reopening nonessential retail establishments must ask employees health screening questions and require them to take their temperatures at home prior to arriving at work, or take their temperatures when they arrive using non-touch thermometers to the greatest extent possible. Any worker with a temperature of 100.4°F or higher is considered to have a fever and must be sent home. A separate order creates identical requirements for employers at low-risk construction sites, and another order requires restaurant employers to screen their employees for COVID-19 symptoms prior to each shift. Separate orders for landscaping establishments reopening and nonessential retail establishments require COVID-19 screening at the beginning of each shift.

West Virginia

Yes

Requirement that restaurant/bar employers, lodging establishments and retail establishments monitor their employees daily by asking screening questions about common symptoms of COVID-19. Lodging and restaurant/bar employers are advised to take their temperature prior to leaving for work or upon arrival. If their temperature measures over 100.4°F, the employee should notify management and not begin work. A separate recommendation for small businesses advises those employers to screen employees for COVID-19 symptoms daily using a series of screening questions.Employers of small businesses should consider the following guidelines to help protect their employees, customers, and the citizens of the State of West Virginia:Screen employees: Screen all employees reporting to work daily for COVID-19symptoms with the following questions:- Have you been in close contact with a confirmed case ofCOVID-19?- Are you experiencing a cough, shortness of breath, or sore throat? - Have you had a fever in the last 48 hours?- Have you had new loss of taste or smell?o Have you had vomiting or diarrhea in the last 24 hours?‍

Wisconsin

None

As of the most recent up date Wisconsin does not have a requirement for employee health screening.

Wyoming

Yes

The State of Wyoming has separate orders for restaurants/bars, gyms, and personal care services require employers to screen their employees for symptoms of illness prior to each shift. A separate guidance document recommends but does not require that all employers conduct similar pre-work employee health screenings.